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This is the most sought-after coin in the United States. Only five of these coins made it past destruction, and one of these in your possession could solve many of your financial problems. Two of these five specimens are in museums, but there are three still out there. The first one found was also the first US coin to reach $100,000 at auction. Subsequent auctions for the five coins paid a total of around $10,000,000.

Have you given up, or do you know the answer?

It is the 1913 Liberty Head Nickel. This coin is legendary because of the fact that 5 of these coins escaped the melting pot, and 3 are still out there!

In 1883, the Liberty Head Nickel was designed to replace the Shield Nickel. In 1913, the Liberty Head coin was replaced by the Buffalo Nickel, but about 1,000,000 Liberty Heads had already been produced. The result was the melting pot for most of these coins. However, one person at the mint illegally stole 5 of these coins, saving them from destruction.  He would later sell them.

There were the five specimens of this coin:

  • The Eliasberg Specimen is the finest known 1913 Liberty Head Nickel, and was sold in 2007 to an unnamed collector
  • The Olsen Specimen is the best preserved of the 5 coins and was sold for a whopping $3.7 million in 2010
  • The Norweb Specimen was donated to a museum in 1977
  • The Walton Specimen is the most elusive of the 5 famous coins, having not been know to exist for 40 years. It was discovered and sold in 2013 for $3 million
  • The McDermott Specimen is the only coin of the 5 that has circulation marks on it. It was donated to a museum in 1989

Here’s another question: Is the 1913 Liberty Head Nickel legal tender? Yes, but at auction it is worth millions of dollars! With that price tag, who would want to use it, anyway?

1913 Liberty Head Nickel This photo was provided by Superior Galleries for promotional purposes, and was taken from Wikipedia

1913 Liberty Head Nickel (Eliasberg specimen)
This photo was provided by Superior Galleries for promotional purposes, and was taken from Wikipedia

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